Top 5 light reads for summer 2022

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It’s been an eventful year up to now for most entrepreneurs. Here’s our selection of the top five light reads from BDC for you to peruse this summer. Whether you’re on the beach or still at work, you can glean some business inspiration from our curated selection. Ready, set, read!

1. Client story—Understanding your finances: This entrepreneur’s secret to international growth

When she started Tease Tea, a tea and botanical products company, founder Sheena Brady didn’t have a habit of using a credit card. Brady was making half a million dollars in revenue but couldn’t secure a business loan because of her weak credit score. That didn’t stop her. Since then, Brady has doubled her online sales and captured 140 retailers for her products. It all comes down to improving her financial knowhow.

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2. Article—7 low-cost ways to lower your business’s carbon footprint

You can cut emissions with a few small gestures like re-programming your thermostats, implementing “turn off” policies for computers, and installing air curtains in high traffic areas. This guide shows you that going green doesn’t have to be complicated.

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3. Article—What is an entrepreneur?

What makes someone a good entrepreneur? If you find yourself constantly taking on difficult projects, or if you hate sitting still and much prefer taking action, then feel reassured this is the right career path for you.

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4. Article—Delegating to employees: 4 barriers and what to do about them

You’ve heard it plenty of times it’s vital to delegate work to your employees, so why don’t you do it more? Like many entrepreneurs, maybe you think it’s easier just to do things yourself. However, assigning other people your tasks means you’ll free up valuable time to focus on other, more important things.

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5. Article—10 things you (probably) didn’t know about Canadian SMEs

The myth that most new businesses are doomed to fail is wrong. Did you know that two-thirds (66.9%) of new businesses in Canada survive to turn five-years old? What about the fact that most small businesses have fewer than four employees?

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